SILENT KILLER

Posted by on September, 2016 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on SILENT KILLER

DIABETES and TRAVEL Michael J. Manyak, MD, MED 92 Medical preparation for a trip into the field is more than having your shots and your diarrhea medicine packed. One increasing problem that gains little attention on remote travel is the traveler with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is serious chronic condition that affects over 350 million people globally with an expected 50 percent increase over the next decade. Once considered rather rare at younger ages, there is an increasing incidence of DM in the general population with the mean age at...

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ITCHING TO GO

Posted by on September, 2016 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on ITCHING TO GO

A Rash On Your Ash Michael J. Manyak, MD, MED 92 Whether distasteful to look at or causing discomfort, rashes are annoying and possibly quite uncomfortable though rarely an emergency. But when is a rash, an annoying discomfort, something more problematic? Aye, that is the rub. Many skin disorders result from chronic conditions, like eczema, that do not require urgent treatment while on travel unless severe or complicated by secondary bacterial infection. These were likely present before travel and known to the individual. Other rashes may...

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A BLOODY MESS

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Keeping Your Nose Out of Trouble Michael J. Manyak, MD, MED 92 A common problem on expeditions is the occurrence of nosebleeds. Many of us have faced this issue at some time in our lives and these usually can be controlled even in a remote area without access to advanced medical care. The nasal cavity has a lot of rather fragile blood vessels close to the surface of the nasal lining. Nosebleeds can be quite frightening but do not often indicate a serious medical problem. Environmental conditions like low humidity, cold, and high altitude can...

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IS THIS THE BIG ONE?

Posted by on August, 2016 in THE EXPLORERS JOURNAL ARTICLES | Comments Off on IS THIS THE BIG ONE?

Caring for Your Heart in the Field by Michael J. Manyak, MD, MED 92 Chest pain is an alarming situation when it occurs in the field, creating anxiety because of its association with cardiac issues.  Chest pain is a major cause of emergency room visits for adults but the majority of individuals experiencing chest pain do not have life-threatening problems.  However, early treatment is often very important for those who do.  Awareness of risk factors, triggers, and key warning signs will improve your odds of preventing or surviving...

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MIND-NUMBING EXPERIENCE

Posted by on August, 2016 in THE EXPLORERS JOURNAL ARTICLES | Comments Off on MIND-NUMBING EXPERIENCE

Dealings with Headaches by Michael J. Manyak, MD, FACS, MED 92 The term headache describes a myriad of problems whether they are truly medical or actually situational (like long airline check-in lines). Most headaches with a medical origin are an unwelcome nuisance…..but fortunately it rarely is a life-threatening emergency. Knowing how to prevent headaches, how to treat them before they ruin your day, and knowing when a headache is more than a headache is important for every traveler to know. Headaches are common with three quarters of the...

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EXTREME INSURANCE

Posted by on August, 2016 in THE EXPLORERS JOURNAL ARTICLES | Comments Off on EXTREME INSURANCE

Don’t Leave Home Without It by Michael J. Manyak, MD, MED 92 There has been a tremendous increase in travel for educational, recreational, or adventure purposes including travel to previously inaccessible sites.  The exploration community is thriving with expeditions to all corners of the globe.  Travelers now have electronic access to travel health information, though differing opinions for prevention and management of medical problems sows some confusion about proper preparation and insurance coverage.  The recent announcement that TEC...

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RESPIRATORY PREPARATION

Posted by on August, 2016 in THE EXPLORERS JOURNAL ARTICLES | Comments Off on RESPIRATORY PREPARATION

Breathing Easier in the Field by Michael J. Manyak, MD, MED 92 A healthy respiratory system is key to safe adventure travel due to the exertion required no matter what the activity.  This is especially true on an expedition where greater demands on respiration are more likely than on ordinary travel.  A person breathes about 25,000 times a day taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide as a critical part of our metabolism.  Risk to the respiratory system on travel includes increased exposure to infectious diseases, exacerbation of...

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CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?

Posted by on August, 2016 in THE EXPLORERS JOURNAL ARTICLES | Comments Off on CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?

Communicating in Remote Places by Michael J. Manyak, M.D., FACS Effective communication is essential on an expedition whether it is between trip members, to your operations base, or to the outside world.  Poor field communications have plagued us all at times and despite advanced technology, one cannot rely on smart phones alone.  Dr. Christian Macedonia FN ’98, project manager at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), is with us to discuss field communication.  Chris is on the medical faculty at Johns Hopkins and a...

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THE BUZZ ABOUT BEES

Posted by on August, 2016 in THE EXPLORERS JOURNAL ARTICLES | Comments Off on THE BUZZ ABOUT BEES

Dealing with Insect Stings by Michael J. Manyak, MD, MED 92 Most organisms become more active with warm weather.  But along with the beauties of nature come some very necessary creatures which cause occasional consequences for humans.  The sometimes disproportionate fear of certain insects is well ingrained in our psyche.  Unfortunately for some, bee and wasp stings pose a real threat to health beyond temporary discomfort.  The Burmese proverb to beware of a man’s shadow and a bee’s sting is certainly prescient for the travelers with...

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TAKING THE HIGH ROAD

Posted by on August, 2016 in THE EXPLORERS JOURNAL ARTICLES | Comments Off on TAKING THE HIGH ROAD

by Michael J. Manyak, MD, MED ‘92 Every year spring brings with the thaw a spate of activities at higher altitudes and prompts questions about altitude illness. Serious mountaineers begin to peer skyward while seasons open at popular travel destinations such as Machu Picchu, Kilimanjaro, and Everest Base Camp. Altitude illness results from low oxygen levels (hypoxia) which occur with increasing altitude. For example, the oxygen content in air at 10,000 feet is 69 percent of that at sea level. Compounding the effects of hypoxia for travelers...

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